Is the dental implant prone to cavities or gum disease?

When investing in dental implants, patients often want reassurance that the devices will last for many, many years. Indeed, one of the benefits of these devices is their durability.

Dental implants are made of titanium, which fuses with the jaw after the oral surgeon inserts the device in a surgical procedure.

Because the implant is made of metal, it is not susceptible to cavities. In fact this is one of many advantages of the treatment that oral surgeons may note when discussing options with their patients. Similarly, the bacteria that cause gum disease will not have a direct effect on the implant. 

…dental implant patients are encouraged to maintain a thorough, effective oral hygiene routine to prevent the gum disease that may compromise the implant.

The implant itself will not be affected by the bacteria that cause gum disease, but that doesn’t mean that dental implant patients are free from concern about that condition. Untreated gum disease can ultimately attack the bone, and weakened bone material cannot continue to support an implant.

For this reason, it is essential to have any periodontal disease treated and managed before proceeding with dental implants, and your oral surgeon should thoroughly examine your gums in the treatment planning stages to determine if some sort of gum disease intervention is warranted. If you do not have your gum disease addressed, your chances of implant failure are much higher, limiting the durability of the devices.

Furthermore, dental implant patients are encouraged to maintain a thorough, effective oral hygiene routine to prevent the gum disease that may compromise the implant. Brush twice a day and floss daily to keep oral bacteria at bay. Schedule dental exams and professional cleanings at least every six months, and be sure to let the dental hygienist know where the implant is located in case special tools or techniques are needed in your cleaning.

You can get decades out of your dental implants if you care for them adequately, but oral health conditions may threaten the devices. Work with your oral surgeon to develop a care plan for your implants.

For additional information, contact the office of Dr. Stephen Weisglass at 718-544-8787 today.

On May 7th, 2013, posted in: oral surgeon by
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